Psychology (PS)

PS501: Foundations of Professional Psychology

This course will provide the graduate student with an overview of the skills needed to study about, and work within, the field of psychology. These skills, as they relate to the field of psychology, include academic writing, APA style formatting, critical reading and evaluation of scholarly literature, critical thinking, support and networking through school and professional resources, career exploration, and understanding state and national licensure/credentialing. Students will demonstrate use and application of these skills as they evaluate subfields of psychology and analyze theoretical and conceptual foundations of psychology.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS502: Ethics and Standards of Professional Psychology

This course explores professional codes of ethics and standards related to research and the practice of psychology. Emphasis will be placed on application of the American Psychological As­sociation Code of Ethics and standards in the field. Students will analyze and evaluate ethical and legal decision-making practices and operations within professional organizations. Cultural and social fac­tors and the implications for scholar-practitioners are also explored.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS504: Advanced Research Methods

This course provides an in-depth look at the conceptual underpinnings and methodologies of psychological research. Students will explore qualitative and quantitative research methods, learn about data analysis, and apply concepts to design hypothetical research studies. Topics include the Scientific Method, issues in experimental psychology, evaluation of internal and external validity, ethical considerations, and responsibilities in writing and reporting research findings. Students will also learn how to become critical evaluators of research.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS505: Testing, Measurement, and Assessment

This course examines the theoretical and conceptual framework of psychological testing, measurement, and assessment. Students learn about psychological test construction and psychometrics, and survey specific assessments and tools related to intelligence, education, personality, and clinical situations. Students also explore the uses and limitations of psychological testing and assessment, as well as ethical issues involved in the administration and interpretation of psychological testing and assessment results.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: PS504, or IX540 and enrollment in the Master of Science in Educational Psychology

PS506: Life Span Development

This course examines human development through the life span from conception to death. The student will use case studies to examine biological, social, and cognitive changes at each stage of life and their relevance to clinical, educational, and social problems. Students also evaluate the major psychosocial issues and conflicts that arise and identify individual and social needs at each stage of development.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS507: Ethics for Behavior Analysts

This course explores professional issues and ethics in the field of applied behavior analysis. Emphasis will be placed on ethical codes specific to the science and practice of behavior analysis. You will also analyze personal biases that may impact on the ethical decision-making process.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS508: Ethics for Addictions Professionals

This course provides an in-depth study of the laws, ethics, confidentiality requirements, and protocols that guide clinical addictions work in professional settings. You will study the relevant codes of ethics in the addictions field. The curriculum will provide an in-depth understanding of ethical theory, an understanding of diverse populations, and knowledge of federal/state confidentiality laws. You will analyze and evaluate moral and legal issues, as well as any personal and socio-cultural influences, that may impact the ethical decision-making process. You will develop decision-making skills that will impact your analysis and responses to complex ethical issues.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS510: Qualitative Analysis

This course provides an overview of some of the major concepts and issues in Qualitative Research as it applies to the field of Psychology. Learners will examine various methodological issues, data collection methods, interpretation and coding strategies, and conceptual and ethical issues involved in Qualitative Research. Learners are assisted in thinking critically about these conceptual issues, as well as the validity and reliability of these research methodologies.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS511: Chemical and Psychological Dependency Counseling

This course provides an overview of dependency counseling strategies using a biopsychological approach to help identify, change, and maintain dependency-free behaviors. You will use your understanding of the biopsychological model to explore how substance use disorders begin and intensify as a complicated interaction between chemical and behavioral changes that occur during addiction. You will practice identifying diagnoses using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and proposing appropriate interventions through evaluating and writing case studies.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS512: Research Design in Applied Behavior Analysis

This course will introduce you to single-case research design (SCRD), an applied research approach used in applied behavior analysis (ABA) to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions with individuals. The term single-case research design is also referred to as single-subject research design (SSRD) in the behavioral sciences. The basic premise of this quantitative experimental approach is that research subjects serve as their own control. In this course, you will learn how to select from basic SCRD to determine the effectiveness of an intervention in applied settings (i.e., real-world scenario). You will also be introduced to the legal, ethical, and social validity aspects as they relate to the design and evaluation of an intervention through SCRD.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS515: Learning and Behavior

This course provides an overview of some of the major concepts and issues in learning theory. Students will examine the scientific study of how learning is acquired, maintained, and adapted. Emphasis is placed on behavioral, social, cognitive, affective, and motivational factors in human learning. Students are assisted in interpreting available empirical research and in thinking critically about the ethical application of that research.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS516: Psychopharmacology

This course surveys basic psychopharmacological concepts, the effects of various psychotropics and drugs of addiction on the brain, the role of neurotransmitters in mental disorders and medicinal interventions, and the pathophysiology of mental disorders including use disorders. You will focus on basic principles of psychopharmacology and drug-receptor interactions and dose-response relationships as well as examine how specific drug families affect different parts of the brain in cases of psychopharmacological treatments. You will learn the value of an interdisciplinary approach to treatment, consultation and referrals. You will use your understanding of basic psychopharmacology to propose appropriate diagnoses and interventions for hypothetical clients, and to evaluate current research studies.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: PS511

PS517: Advanced Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis

This course covers advanced principles, theo­ries, and concepts of Applied Behavior Analysis. The assessment and development of behavioral interventions are covered, along with real-life examples, case studies, and current research in this area of psychology.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS520: Neuropsychology

This course provides an introduction to major concepts and issues in the field of Neuropsychology, including methodological and research issues. Students will explore the major components of neuroanatomy and the assessment and diagnosis of neuropsychological syndromes. Students will also examine ethical, legal, and forensic issues in the research and application of neuropsychology.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS521: Group Counseling

This course focuses on the theory and practice of group counseling and its application to substance related and process disorders. Concepts include stages of group development, theories of group counseling, including the interactional group model, strategies for group motivation, and group process. You will engage in group simulation exercises wherein you will take on roles of different group archetypes in order to evaluate group situational reactions, evaluate current research studies, develop group session plans, and propose strategies for solving common group problems that arise during the course of treatment. The application of group counseling theory and practice to culturally diverse groups is addressed.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS522: Behavioral Measures and Interpretation of Data

This course will provide you with a foundational knowledge in behavioral assessment used in the field of applied behavior analysis. Specific topics to be discussed include measurement of behavior, functional behavior assessment techniques, and experimental analysis (i.e., functional analysis and structural analysis). You will learn how to analyze and visually display data to communicate the results in a clear, efficient, and parsimonious manner.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS525: Foundations of Psychopathology

This course explores the major concepts, issues, and the theory of psychopathology as behavior that is considered normal and that is considered pathological is reviewed. Topics include emotional, personality, psychotic, and development disorders; current research methodologies; and ethical/legal issues in clinical practice. You will be introduced to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) system, which is used as a format for classification of disorders and choice of treatments for both child and adult mental disorders. Assessment strategies and limitations of diagnostic systems will also be examined.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS526: Advanced Addictions Counseling

This course provides an in-depth examination of substance and process use disorders dynamics. You will use your knowledge of counseling theories common to substance and process use disorder counseling, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, to evaluate case studies, diagnose substance and process use disorders, and propose appropriate treatments. Ethical dilemmas that occasionally arise in the counselor/client relationship will be analyzed and discussed. Additionally, you will evaluate case studies that contain ethical, legal, and sociocultural issues using the code of ethics of addiction counseling.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS527: Implementing Behavioral Change

This course covers the fundamentals of implementing a behavior change program in Applied Behavioral Analysis. Students will gain skill and practice in how to design an effective behavior change program through the use of real-life case study examples. The different factors involved in maintaining and promoting the generalization of behavioral change in real-world settings will be explored.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS530: Cognitive Psychology

This course surveys the major concepts and issues in Cognitive Psychology. Topics include the scientific study of mind and mental functions including attention, memory, perception, problem solving, language, imagery and categorization, and human consciousness. Students will interpret available empirical research and use critical thinking to apply that research.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: PS520

PS531: Co-Occurring Disorders and Treatments

This course will prepare you to work with clients diagnosed with substance use disorders and mental health disorders. You will display practical skills that apply to complex problems related to having substance use and various types of mental health disorders. Different treatment models will be evaluated, and you will use your knowledge of co-occurring theory to analyze and assess research and case studies.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS532: Clinical Applications of Applied Behavior Analysis

This course provides an overview of the various clinical methods of behavior change, along with more current research on evidence-based best practices in Applied Behavioral Analysis. Students will consider the practical, ethical, legal, cultural, and social validity needs of a client into an effective behavior change plan.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS535: Addictions Practicum I

The 150-hour practicum experience in addictions is designed to prepare you as a graduate student clinician by extending the program's classroom-based experiential components to produce a professional learning experience. The practicum is designed to integrate academic knowledge with practical experience and prepares you for future training in professional psychology.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS536: Addictions Practicum II

Addictions Practicum II is an extension to the Addictions Practicum I experience and is designed to prepare graduate student clinicians by extending the program's didactic and classroom-based experiential components to produce an increasingly sophisticated learning experience. The practicum is designed to integrate academic knowledge with practical experience and prepares the student for future training in professional psychology.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: PS535

PS540: Industrial/Organizational Theory and Development

This course focuses on the structure, function, processes, and other organizational -level constructs that impact the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations. Emphasis is on classical and contemporary theories of organizations, organizational structure, organizational design, technology, and the process of organizational policy formation and implementation. The course explores theory and research into surveying and facilitating change in individuals, groups, and organizations to improve effectiveness, efficiency, satisfaction, work life quality, and retention.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS541: Organizational Management and Behavior

This course examines the theoretical foundations of organizational management and behavior, and explores how organizations function. Topics include decision making and group processes in organizations; conflict management and resolution; nature and design of effective organizations; power, influence, and internal politics; and program and organizational development and evaluation.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS542: Workplace Motivation and Attitudes

This course examines the individual/team and the workplace environment, paying particular attention to direction, strength, and persistence of relevant individual/team behavior in organizations when individual/team abilities and organizational constraints are held constant. The course will focus on human motivation and relevant psychological research and theory related to the field of industrial/organizational psychology. Emphasis is placed on determinants, consequences, and measurement of job satisfaction, work life quality, and related constructs such as involvement and commitment.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS543: Organizational Leadership - Management, Training, and Evaluation

This course focuses on the development of skills for supervising, training, and evaluating employees. The course explores theory and practice in job and task analysis along with performance appraisal including legal aspects, techniques available, current research, cognitive aspects, and reliability and validity issues. Emphasis is on methods of measuring and evaluating individuals as they perform organizational tasks and actions with individuals emerging from such appraisals, including coaching. The knowledge base includes a thorough understanding of rating scale construction and use, as well as understanding of the relative advantages of different rating sources (e.g., supervisory vs. peer).

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS544: Human Resources Management

This course examines psychological principles related to human resources management in both physical and virtual work environments. Topics include aspects of the hiring process, including employee selection and performance appraisal; affirmative action, labor laws, harassment, and equal-opportunity decision making; design and evaluation of training programs; training methods and leadership/management development; the work environment; compensation, benefits, and rate increases; and disciplinary action.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS545: Industrial/Organizational Field Placement

The field placement experience in industrial/organizational psychology is designed to prepare graduate student clinicians by extending the program's didactic and classroom-based experiential components to produce an increasingly sophisticated learning experience. The field placement is designed to integrate academic knowledge with practical experience, and prepares the student for future training in professional psychology.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS550: Principles of Forensic Psychology

This course provides you with a comprehensive overview of forensic psychology, including major theories and the key definitions in the field. You will explore basic principles of forensic psychology and its interaction with the civil courts and criminal justice system including: police psychology, psychology in criminal courts, psychology in civil cases, family law cases, and correctional psychology. You will learn about the roles and responsibilities in forensic psychology, as well as diversity, multicultural, and ethical issues faced by practitioners in the field.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS551: Forensic Psychology and the Law

In this course, you will learn about the law as it pertains to the role of psychology in the legal system, including how the legal system intersects with professionalism and ethical standards. You will explore the functions and responsibilities of forensic psychology professionals in the courtroom. You also will explore the role of forensic experts in consultation and providing testimony in legal settings. These functions and roles include criminal accountability, violence prediction and prevention, as well as recommendations for interventions in cases of criminal, civil, and family law.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS552: Theories of Criminal Behavior

In this course, you will learn about the primary psychological models of criminal behavior, such as biological, genetic, developmental, social, behavioral, cognitive, sociological, and humanistic. You will investigate the interaction and role of substance abuse and mental illness in criminal behavior and the theory and practice of violence assessment and prediction.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS553: Advanced Principles of Forensic Psychology

In this course, you will critique and appraise advanced forensic psychology topics that will prepare you to apply forensic psychology concepts in related fields and settings. You will integrate the skills that forensic psychology practitioners need to succeed in various roles within the forensic psychology field, including case assessments, expert opinion, expert testimony, assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of forensic populations, criminal profiling, and jury consultation.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: PS550

PS555: Applied Behavior Analysis Fieldwork

The fieldwork experience in applied behavior analysis is designed to provide you an opportunity to acquire new behavior-analytic skills related to the current BACB task list. These activities should be consistent with the dimensions of applied behavior analysis identified in the seminal article "Some Current Dimensions of Applied Behavior Analysis" by Baer, Wolf, and Risley (1968). You will gain practical experience designing and implementing behavior change programs for clients in various real-world settings. This course is appropriate for students seeking to sit for the BCBA exam under the Supervised Independent Fieldwork Experience Category.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS559: Practicum Field Placement Extension

This course will continue the mentored learning experience in the specialization area at the site approved by the University. This course may be taken after a psychology practicum or field placement course for the specific purpose of completion of the required hours.

Quarter Credit Hours: 0 | Prerequisite: Permission of Clinical Placement Team

PS560: Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis

This course provides a foundation of basic concepts and core principles in applied behavior analysis. You will gain an understanding of the historical, conceptual, and philosophical assumptions that form the basis of applied behavior analysis. In addition, you will study behavior analytic terminology in preparation for practical applications in assessment and intervention.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS561: Concepts of Measurement and Experimental Designs

This course introduces you to single-case research designs used to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions in applied behavior analysis. You will learn how to evaluate reliability, validity, and measurement integrity in research, as well as how to use methods for observing and measuring behavioral data. Emphasis will be placed on the process of creating graphs for single-case research designs and interpreting graphical representations of data through visual analysis.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS562: Assessment in Applied Behavior Analysis

This course will address the various assessment procedures that inform the identification and treatment of target behaviors. You will gain an understanding of functional assessment procedures that use direct and indirect methods of assessment, including functional analysis. The course will also introduce various skill-based assessments as well as techniques to identify reinforcers using preference assessments.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: PS560 and PS561

PS563: Implementing Procedures for Behavior Change

This course addresses the fundamentals of designing effective behavioral interventions that promote, maintain, and generalize socially significant behaviors. You will learn how to determine treatment goals, design interventions based on functional assessment data, develop effective teaching procedures for behavior change, and identify possible unintended effects of a behavioral intervention. Finally, you will develop a comprehensive behavior intervention plan that considers the ethical, practical, legal, cultural, and social validity factors of a real-world setting.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: PS507, PS560, PS561, and PS562

PS564: Clinical Applications, Supervision, and Management

This course addresses the key considerations of supervision and management of personnel and supervisees. You will examine how to establish performance expectations and goals, develop a plan for training personnel, and implement function-based strategies to enhance supervisee performance. In addition, you will engage in professional collaborative activities to evaluate team interactions and formulate an effective treatment plan grounded in performance management strategies.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: None

PS600: Comprehensive Exam

This course is required for nonthesis-track students and is comprised of an exam that assesses the student's mastery of the core curriculum courses, specialization courses, and overall compe­tency of program outcomes.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: Successful completion of all comprehensive exam-track courses

PS601: Master's Research and Thesis I

This course provides the student with the tools needed to develop and submit a formal proposal for research relevant to the psychology graduate curriculum and the student's chosen area of study. This course is best suited for students who wish to add to the body of professional knowledge in their chosen field of psychology or who intend to pursue a postgraduate doctoral degree.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: Successful completion of all thesis-track courses except PS602

PS601A: Master's Research and Thesis I

This course provides the student with the tools needed to develop and submit a formal proposal for research relevant to the psychology graduate curriculum and the student's chosen area of study. This course is best suited for students who wish to add to the body of professional knowledge in their chosen field of psychology or who intend to pursue a postgraduate doctoral degree.

Quarter Credit Hours: 0 | Prerequisite: None

PS602: Master's Research and Thesis II

The goal of this course is the completion of the Master of Science in Psychology thesis. You will complete your research, submit the completed thesis to your committee members for review, and orally present your statement of the problem, research design and methods, findings, conclusions, and recommendations during a scheduled thesis defense hearing. The thesis shall be prepared according to APA guidelines and according to University guidelines. The final, approved product shall be submitted to appropriate personnel for binding and acquisition. If appropriate, the thesis must conform to the standards and procedures of the University's Institutional Review Board (IRB). This course is best suited for students who wish to add to the body of professional knowledge in their chosen field of psychology or who intend to pursue a postgraduate doctoral degree.

Quarter Credit Hours: 5 | Prerequisite: PS601

PS602A: Master's Research and Thesis II

The goal of this course is the completion of the Master of Science in Psychology thesis. You will complete your research, submit the completed thesis to your committee members for review, and orally present your statement of the problem, research design and methods, findings, conclusions, and recommendations during a scheduled thesis defense hearing. The thesis shall be prepared according to APA guidelines and according to University guidelines. The final, approved product shall be submitted to appropriate personnel for binding and acquisition. If appropriate, the thesis must conform to the standards and procedures of the University's Institutional Review Board (IRB). This course is best suited for students who wish to add to the body of professional knowledge in their chosen field of psychology or who intend to pursue a postgraduate doctoral degree.

Quarter Credit Hours: 0 | Prerequisite: None